Umami-Rich Napa Cabbage Rolls Stuffed with Rice and Pork

Umami-Rich Napa Cabbage Rolls Stuffed with Rice and Pork

Recipe excerpt from:
The Global Pantry Cookbook
by Ann Taylor Pittman and Scott Mowbray

Global Pantry Ingredients: 

  • Chili Crisp
  • Fish Sauce
  • Korean Toasted Sesame Oil
  • Oyster Sauce

Headnote

This delicious Asian-tilting riff on stuffed cabbage rolls uses fragrant jasmine rice, napa cabbage, and a brothy brown sauce enriched by oyster sauce and toasted sesame oil instead of a tomato-based one. A splash of fish sauce in the porky filling boosts the meaty-savory effect. The result is rich beyond compare, and ever-so-delicately sweet to match the cabbage goodness. We love it with a dollop of chili crisp for extra crunchy umami and heat. Bonus: For anyone who has ever struggled with prying the leaves off a head of regular green cabbage, you’ll be delighted with the ease of working with the napa variety—though we’ve provided instructions for both.

Flavor Booster

The Other Pepper
The pork and rice filling features a good amount of ground white pepper, a variety favored by many Asian food cultures. Its brighter, grassier, less-hot character is a key to the flavor of the filling. Look for whole white peppercorns in Asian stores, or order online, and grind the usual way.

Size Matters

By Big, We Mean Big
Whether you’re using napa or green cabbage, you need big leaves to encase the filling properly—and you want lots of leaf in every bite. For a napa cabbage, opt for a head that’s at least a foot long; for a green cabbage, get the largest one you can find. You’ll have leftover cabbage for a salad or stir-fry the next day.

  • Cooking spray
  • 1 large head napa cabbage or green cabbage
  • 1 pound ground pork
  • 1 cup cooked jasmine rice
  • 2/3 cup thinly sliced scallions
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon ground white pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 large carrot, shredded
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced 
  • 1 1/2 cups unsalted beef stock
  • 1/4 cup oyster sauce
  • 1 tablespoon Korean toasted sesame oil
  • Chili crisp (optional)
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F with the rack placed in the center. Coat a 13 x 9–inch baking dish with cooking spray.
  2. Prepare the cabbage: If using napa cabbage, remove 18 large leaves from the head of cabbage. Trim off 2 or 3 inches from the bottom of each leaf, where the vein is the thickest. Pile the leaves on a microwave-safe plate. Cover loosely with plastic wrap. Microwave on High for 5 minutes. Carefully uncover the plate and cool the cabbage slightly. 

If using a large regular green cabbage, insert a short, sharp knife a couple of inches into the base of the cabbage and cut out a conical piece of the core. This makes removing the stiff outer leaves a bit easier. Follow the instructions in Step 2 to soften in the microwave.
  3. Place the pork in a large bowl. Add the rice, scallions, fish sauce, pepper, salt, carrot, and garlic; mix well with your hands. Divide the pork mixture into 8 equal balls. 
  4. To stuff the leaves: If using napa cabbage, arrange 2 leaves on a work surface, with the narrower rib ends overlapping by an inch or two. Spoon one ball of filling into the center of the cabbage leaves. Fold the left leaf over the filling, and roll over to the right side to enclose the filling in a cylinder. Arrange the filled leaves, seam side down, in the prepared baking dish. Repeat with the remaining cabbage leaves and filling to form 8 cabbage rolls (you should have a couple of extra leaves in case some tear or are too ratty looking). 

If using regular cabbage, place a softened leaf before you with the thick stem part closest to you and a “wing” of the leaf on each side. Cut away a V-shaped notch of that thick stem part, 1 to 2 inches long, to make the leaf more pliable. Place the stuffing at the point of the notch so it’s resting on the leaf between the wings. Fold the bottom of the cabbage leaf forward three-fourths of a turn, then fold in both wings of the cabbage and finish rolling—as if you wee rolling an egg roll. As you complete the cabbage rolls, place them in the prepared baking dish. You should have one extra leaf left over. 
  5. Whisk together the stock, oyster sauce, and sesame oil in a medium bowl; pour over the cabbage rolls. Cover the dish tightly with aluminum foil. Bake until the filling is thoroughly heated, the flavors are married, and the pork is cooked through, 1 hour. Uncover the dish and bake until the liquid is slightly thickened, about 15 minutes; the sauce will be more like broth than gravy. Serve with chili crisp on the side, if desired.

Super-Mushroomy Tiny Pasta Cooked Creamy Like Risotto (But Easier)

Super-Mushroomy Tiny Pasta Cooked Creamy Like Risotto

Recipe excerpt from:
The Global Pantry Cookbook
by Ann Taylor Pittman and Scott Mowbray

Active time: 30 minutes
Total time: 30 minutes
Serves 4

Global Pantry Ingredients: 

  • Dried Porcini Mushrooms
  • Marsala

Headnote

Scott never quite mastered risotto, and mostly left it to the restaurant pros after he began cooking acini di pepe, a tiny semolina pasta shape similar in size to pearl couscous, in the risotto style, inspired by a Mark Bittman recipe of yore. The texture of the pasta here is delightfully supple. It’s an easy, earthy, sophisticated main dish, perfect with a medium-bodied Italian red such as a Barbera or a Valpolicella. Add the optional marsala if you like a slightly deeper, more winey flavor.

Try This!

Dried Porcini Mushrooms
Dried porcini possess a concentration of rich, earthy flavor, an unmatched essence of mushroom that’s released when soaked or powdered in a chopper. Look for American or European versions in supermarkets, Whole Foods, and online, in one or two-ounce packets.

Timing Tip

Cook Just Until Almost Done
The size and manufacturer of the pasta, and how vigorously you cook it, will vary the cooking time quite a bit. To avoid mush, stop when it’s just reaching the al dente stage—it will continue to cook as you add the cheese and serve. The consistency should be a bit saucy, not like seized-up porridge. Slightly larger pasta such as orzo will likely take a bit longer. 

  • 1/2 ounce dried porcini mushrooms
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 medium onion, minced as finely as you can manage
  • 1 cup cremini mushrooms, thinly sliced 
  • 12 ounces acini di pepe or other tiny pasta such as orzo
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken stock
  • 1 tablespoon dry marsala wine or rich sherry (such as oloroso) (optional)
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper 
  • 1/2 cup grated Parmesan, or 1 cup super-finely Microplane-grated Parmesan
  1. Chop half of the dried mushrooms into pea-sized bits. Place in a small microwave-safe bowl with 1 cup of water and microwave on High for 2 minutes; set aside. Place the other half of the dried mushrooms in a mini food processor; pulverize to a powder, about 45 seconds (there will be small flecks or chunks in the powder, and that’s the idea).
  2. Heat a Dutch oven or a large nonstick skillet over medium heat for 2 minutes. Add the butter, swirling until it melts. Add the onion; sauté until softened and blond in color, stirring frequently, about 3 minutes. Add the cremini mushrooms and sauté until just starting to soften, 3 minutes more. Add the soaked mushrooms with their liquid, the mushroom powder, and pasta; cook with the heat turned high enough for it to bubble energetically, stirring frequently until the liquid is absorbed, about 2 minutes. 
  3. This starts the risotto-style cooking process: Continue to stir, adding the white wine and then the stock a little at a time, letting the pasta absorb the liquid, before gradually adding the rest of the stock. When the pasta is almost cooked, about 18 minutes, add the marsala, if using, the thyme, and the salt. When the pasta is just al dente, correct the consistency with stock or hot water if necessary (it should be saucy, not porridge-like). Immediately portion into 4 bowls and top with a few turns of black pepper and the grated cheese. 

“Instant” Dutch Yellow Potatoes

Instant Dutch Yellow Potatoes

Recipe excerpt from:
American Gravy
by Andrew Gruel

Sometimes when I come home late, I have to make a meal for the family with whatever is left in the fridge. We always keep a bag of Melissa’s Dutch Yellow Potatoes on hand, so I commonly revert back to this quick and simple classic. Most importantly, the kids and my boss love it.

This is a simple 2-step process. First, you cook the potatoes in boiling acidulated water. The vinegar acts to prevent the starch from breaking down. Next, you strain and slice the potatoes, then pan-sear them as if you were cooking scallops. Finish with some butter, sea salt, and fresh parmesan; you’re all set with a delicious meal (or side) in around 20 minutes.

About Dutch Yellow Potatoes. Dutch Yellow® Potatoes or DYPs®, are the perfect small potato. Grown in nutrient-rich volcanic soil, DYPs® are produced under the best conditions possible. These potatoes are round with golden yellow skin and creamy yellow flesh. DYPs® have a rich texture with a mixture of buttery and nutty flavors and the perfect amount of starchiness. Naturally resistant to greening and sprouting, they’re convenient to use and have a great shelf life.

Ingredients

  • One bag of Dutch Yellow Potatoes (about 1 lb)
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar or cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 2 tablespoon butter
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or sea salt
  • fresh chives and fresh cracked peppers to garnish

Steps

Put your potatoes in a small sauce pot cover with cold water, add vinegar, and bring to a boil. Boil for about 15 minutes or until they are fork tender. Strain the potatoes and run cool water over them so they are easy to handle. Slice the in half. Get a saute pan hot and add the olive oil. Sear the potatoes on each side, or saute and flip, then finish with some whole butter off the heat. Garish with chives, salt and pepper and serve with a blizzard of fresh parmesan.

Artichoke and Crab Pasta

Artichoke and Crab Pasta by Michael Crupain MD

Recipe excerpt from:
The Power Five: Essential Foods for Optimum Health

by Michael Crupain, MD, MPH

This is inspired by the classic dip, usually weighed down with lots of cream cheese, on menus at many bars and restaurants. This version features the artichoke and crab in their purest and healthiest forms. I prefer to use king crab, which has a decent amount of omega-3s, but you can use blue crab, too. The artichoke base of this recipe is the crema di carciofi that is also in the recipe for carciofi e pepe pasta in The What to Eat When Cookbook.

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 pound king crab legs
  • 1 (15-ounce) can quartered
  • artichokes, drained
  • 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more to finish
  • Salt
  • 400 grams whole wheat
  • linguine, spaghetti, or home-made Sourdough Busiate
  • Pepper
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh
  • parsley

Directions

  1. Cut the crab shells using a pair of kitchen shears, and remove the crab meat. Chop the crab meat into chunks and reserve.
  2. Process the artichokes and oil in a Vitamix or other high-speed blender on low speed, gradually increasing the speed and pureeing until the mixture is very thick (it may not puree if you increase the speed too quickly). Scrape the sides of the blender, then shake the jar, and continue to puree on high speed, adding 2 to 3 tablespoons water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until a very smooth puree is reached. Be patient; this may take 3 to 4 minutes. Season with salt to taste.
  3. Place the artichoke puree in a sauté pan with the crab meat, and warm gently over low heat while you make the pasta.
  4. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add enough salt to make the water salty like the sea. Cook the pasta according to the package directions until al dente. Drain the pasta, reserving some of the cooking water; transfer pasta to the artichoke mixture, and stir to combine. Add a little pasta water if it’s too thick. Season with pepper to taste, garnish with the parsley, and drizzle with olive oil.

NOTE: If using dried pasta, you can use the whole box if you want, but Dr. Crupain recommends 100 grams per person.

Mushroom Toast

Mushroom Tahini Toast by Michael Crupain MD

Recipe excerpt from:
The Power Five: Essential Foods for Optimum Health

by Michael Crupain, MD, MPH

When bread becomes toast, it undergoes a Maillard chemical reaction, which is a food-geek way to say it becomes even tastier. It also adds a crustiness, for an ever-better bed for toppings like the mushroom-tahini mixture in this recipe. This is a crowd-pleasing appetizer, but sometimes I have it for breakfast or lunch. If you’re feeling fancy, garnish with a sprig of thyme at the end for a picture-perfect finish.

Prep time: 25 minutes
Cook time: 15 minutes
Serves: 4 to 6

Ingredients

  • 1 pound assorted mushrooms (such as oyster, maitake, shiitake)
  • ½ teaspoon urfa chile flakes (dried Turkish chile peppers)
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for finishing
  • Salt
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, chopped
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 3 tablespoons tahini
  • 4 slices whole wheat or sourdough bread, toasted and rubbed with a raw garlic clove

Directions

Coarsely chop the mushrooms, and add to a bowl with the chile flakes and oil. Toss to coat the mushrooms.

Cook the mushrooms in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat for 8 to 10 minutes or until browned. Season with salt, add the garlic, shallot, and thyme, and sauté for 4 minutes or until the shallot is soft. Stir in the wine, and cook until just evaporated. Turn off the heat, and stir in the tahini. If the mixture is too dry, add 1 to 2 tablespoons water for desired consistency. Spoon the mushrooms over the toast, sprinkle with salt to taste, and serve.

Apple Brickle Dip

Apple Brickle Dip by Kristyn Merkley

Recipe excerpt from:
Lil’ Luna’s So Easy & So Yummy

by Kristyn Merkley

This 5-Ingredient Apple Brickle Dip recipe takes minutes to make and is so delicious! Plus, it uses common ingredients. The addition of Heath Toffee Bits makes it even better!

Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese softened
  • ½ cup packed light brown sugar
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 (8-ounce) package Heath Toffee Bits
  • Sliced apples: Gala, Fuji or Honeycrisp for serving

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, beat cream cheese, both sugars and vanilla with a hand mixer.
  2. Fold in toffee bits and refrigerate until ready to serve.
  3. Serve with sliced apples for dipping.

Notes

Make Ahead: You can make this dip 3–5 days ahead of time. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
More Dipping Ideas: Though this dip was created for apples, you can certainly use other delicious dippers such as pineapple spears, berries, graham crackers, pretzels, vanilla wafers, Oreos or gingersnaps.

Fruit Dip

Fruit Dip by Kristyn Merkle

Recipe excerpt from:
Lil’ Luna’s So Easy & So Yummy

by Kristyn Merkley

Cream Cheese Fruit Dip is one of the best fruit dip recipes you will ever try. It whips up in no time, and ALWAYS vanishes in minutes!

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

  •  1½ cups powdered sugar
  • 1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 (8-ounce) tub whipped topping, (or 3 cups homemade whipped cream)
  • 1 (7-ounce) jar Marshmallow Fluff
  • strawberries, pineapple, grapes or pound cake pieces, for serving

Instructions

  1. In a medium bowl, beat powdered sugar, cream cheese, and vanilla together with a hand mixer on low speed until well mixed.
  2. Fold in whipped topping and Marshmallow Fluff.
  3. Chill until ready to serve. Serve with fruit or pound cake for dipping.

Notes

Make Ahead: This dip can be made 5–7 days in advance. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator and mix thoroughly before serving.
Serving Tip: To serve cut fruit alongside this dip without it turning brown, squeeze a lemon over the fruit and gently toss. This will ensure the fruit lasts longer for serving.

Spicy Tomato and Egg Soup

Spicy Tomato and Egg Soup

Recipe excerpt from:
Chili Crisp: 50+ Recipes to Satisfy Your Spicy, Crunchy, Garlicky Cravings

by James Park

I love having soup for breakfast. It offers the same comfort as sipping a hot cup of coffee to start a day, but with more flavors! I crave this spicy tomato and egg soup, especially as my hangover cure the morning after a night of too much drinking. When I first tasted this easy homey Chinese soup, I immediately thought of gyeran-guk, Korean egg drop soup. I tried a lot of Chinese comfort food after I moved to the United States, and it was so special to experience familiar yet different flavors each time. Regardless of my Korean identity, the comfort I felt from enjoying this soup was universal.

Taking the time to cook tomatoes in green onion and garlic–infused oil releases their sweet and tangy natural juices, creating an incredible broth with minimal seasonings. Using chili crisp early in the cooking process, rather than as a finishing touch, adds pleasant heat and umami and allows the flavors to deepen.

You can enjoy the soup on its own, but I love eating it gukbap style, which means rice served with the soup in Korean cuisine. Add a scoop of warm rice to the soup bowl and pour the soup directly on top of the rice. Or use this soup as a base for your favorite noodle soup. Starting a day with this warm, flavorful soup will make a big difference in your energy throughout the day, especially if you have a hangover. It works like magic for me every single time!

Serves 2 or 3

  • 1 Tbsp neutral oil, such as vegetable or canola
  • 4 green onions, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced (about 1 Tbsp)
  • 3 medium tomatoes, roughly chopped into 2 to
  • 3 in [5 to 7.5 cm] chunks
  • 1 tsp kosher salt, plus more as needed
  • ¼ cup [60 g] chili crisp
  • ½ medium yellow onion, sliced
  • 2 cups [480 ml] chicken broth or water
  • 1 Tbsp light soy sauce
  • 2 tsp rice wine vinegar
  • 1 tsp toasted sesame oil
  • 2 tsp cornstarch
  • 3 large eggs
  • Warm rice or cooked noodles, for serving
  1. In a large pot over medium-high heat, heat the neutral oil. Set aside 1 Tbsp of the green parts of the chopped green onions and add the rest of the green onions and the minced garlic to the pot. Sauté for 30 to 60 seconds, or until fragrant. Add the tomato chunks and salt, and cook for 2 to 4 minutes, or until the tomatoes are softened. Add the chili crisp and sliced onion to the pot. Cook for 1 minute while stirring.
  2. Add the 2 cups [480 ml] broth and bring it to a boil, then turn the heat to low, season the soup with soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, and sesame oil, and let simmer for 5 to 10 minutes.
  3. While the soup is simmering, prepare a slurry by mixing the cornstarch with 1 Tbsp of water in a small bowl. Set it aside.
  4. Crack the eggs into a bowl, and beat them until the whites and yolks are fully mixed, preferably using chopsticks.
  5. Bring the heat to medium-high, then slowly pour the beaten eggs in a circular motion into the simmering broth. Don’t touch the eggs for 2 minutes, or until the curdled eggs come up to the surface. Then gently break the eggs apart with a spoon.
  6. Stir in the prepared cornstarch slurry and let it simmer for few minutes more, or until the broth gets slightly shiny and thicker. Season with more salt if necessary.
  7. Serve immediately with the reserved chopped green onions for garnish. Serve with a side of warm rice or cooked noodles for noodle soup. The leftovers can be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 4 days.

Photographer: Heami Lee
Food styling: Pearl Jones
Prop styling: Gözde Eker

Chili Crisp Burrata Salad with Arugula, Apple, and Walnuts

Chili Crisp Burrata Salad with Arugula plus Apple and Walnuts

Recipe excerpt from:
Chili Crisp: 50+ Recipes to Satisfy Your Spicy, Crunchy, Garlicky Cravings

by James Park

I will be honest here: This salad is just an excuse for us to eat creamy burrata with chili crisp. And it’s a fun performance for yourself or a crowd when cutting into a hunk of burrata drizzled with chili crisp. Every time I make this for a dinner party, my dinner guests go wild for it! The thrill and joy everyone gets from seeing the oil and bits of chili crisp fall into the crack of ooey, gooey burrata balls is simply marvelous. The creamy burrata balances the spicy chili crisp, creating a party of flavors that will make you roll your eyes with pleasure. Even though it’s perfectly fine to eat just chili crisp–covered burrata, peppery arugula, and sweet apple bits make each bite of this salad exciting. The dressing also uses some chili crisp, which brings a pleasant warmth. When mixed with sweet, tart balsamic vinegar, it turns into an incredible vinaigrette for one of my favorite salads to eat all the time.

Serves 4

  • 1 Tbsp chili crisp, plus more for drizzling
  • 1½ tsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1½ tsp balsamic vinegar
  • Juice of ½ lemon (about 2 Tbsp)
  • 1 tsp granulated sugar
  • 9 oz [255 g] baby arugula
  • 1 medium apple, such as Granny Smith or Honeycrisp, cored and diced
  • 2 Tbsp roasted walnuts, chopped into small pieces
  • ¼ cup [30 g] freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 lb [455 g] burrata ball
  • Flaky sea salt
  • Freshly cracked black pepper
  1. In a small bowl, add the chili crisp, olive oil, balsamic vinegar, lemon juice, and sugar. Whisk to combine.
  2. In a large bowl, add the baby arugula, diced apple, and the dressing. Toss until everything is well coated with the dressing.
  3. When ready to serve, place the dressed arugula on a platter. Scatter the chopped walnuts over the top and sprinkle with the Parmesan.
  4. Place the burrata ball in the center of the platter and drizzle with extra chili crisp right on top. Sprinkle with flaky sea salt and freshly cracked black pepper and serve.

NOTE: It’s best to grate Parmesan on top of the salad before serving, using a Microplane rather than pregrated Parmesan cheese.

Photographer: Heami Lee
Food styling: Pearl Jones
Prop styling: Gözde Eker

Golden Beet Vinegret Salad

Golden Beet Vinegret Salad by Anna Voloshyna

Recipe excerpt from:
BUDMO!: Recipes from a Ukrainian Kitchen

by Anna Voloshyna

This traditional Slavic beet salad is called vinegret. I came up with this version of the recipe when I ran out of red beets and fresh onions. I found a few golden beets and a jar of pickled red onions in my fridge, and I decided to give it a go. The salad came out so vibrant and beautiful that now I make this version more often than the traditional one. The only thing I would never change is the unrefined sunflower oil. That is what makes this salad taste authentic.

Serves 6 to 8

  • 3 medium golden beets 
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper 
  • 3 medium carrots
  • 2 large Yukon Gold potatoes 
  • 1 cup shelled green peas (fresh or frozen) 
  • 5 large kosher dill pickles
  • 1/2 cup Pickled Red Onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh dill and flat-leaf parsley, in equal parts 
  • 1/3 cup unrefined sunflower oil
  • 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon sugar

In a medium saucepan, combine the beets with water to cover by about 2 inches and a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat and cook until the beets can be easily pierced with a knife, 30 to 40 minutes. In a separate medium saucepan, cook the carrots and potatoes using the same method. When the vegetables are ready, drain them, transfer them to a medium bowl, and let them cool to room temperature, about 30 minutes. 

Meanwhile, bring a small saucepan filled with water to a boil. Fill a small bowl with ice-cold water. Season the boiling water with a pinch of salt, then add the peas and blanch until they are bright green and no longer taste starchy, about 2 minutes. Drain the peas and immerse them in the ice-cold water until they are completely cool, 3 to 5 minutes. Drain the peas and spread them on a paper towel to dry. 

When the beets, potatoes, and carrots are at room temperature, peel them, cut them into 1/4-inch cubes, and transfer them to a large bowl. Cut the pickles and pickled onion into the same-size cubes and add them to the bowl along with the peas, dill, and parsley.

In a small bowl, mix together the oil, vinegar, and sugar with a fork, then season to taste with salt and pepper . Drizzle as much of the dressing as you like over the salad; you may not need all of it. Mix well with a large spoon, then taste and add more dressing and salt if needed. 

Enjoy the salad at room temperature or chilled. It will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days .