Broccoli Salad with Pickled Cranberries and Herb Yogurt Dressing

Broccoli Salad with Pickled Cranberries by Carly KnowlesRecipe excerpt from: The Nutritionist’s Kitchen
by Carly Knowles

Broccoli is one of the most nutrient-dense vegetables out there. It’s loaded with vitamin C, folate, vitamin K, and many other valuable nutrients. It’s part of the cruciferous vegetable family that promotes natural detoxification and has been shown to decrease cancer risk and increase heart health.

Serves 8–10

SALAD

  • ½ cup dried cranberries (I prefer apple juice–sweetened)
  • ¾ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 6 cups broccoli florets (about 2 broccoli heads)
  • 6 cups broccoli stalks, finely chopped or shredded (from 2 broccoli heads)
  • ½ cup sliced almonds, toasted
  • ¼ cup finely chopped red onion

DRESSING

  • 1 cup plain whole-milk yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh tarragon (plus more for garnish)
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh parsley (plus more for garnish)
  • ⅓ cup blue cheese crumbles
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper

Start by quick-pickling the cranberries. Soak them in apple cider vinegar in a small bowl for at least 20 minutes, until they are plump and saturated (the longer the soak time, the better!).

Drain and add to a large mixing bowl. You can forgo quick-pickling the cranberries if you’d like and just add dried cranberries directly to the bowl. Next, add the broccoli florets and stalks, almonds, and red onion. Mix together until combined.

In a medium bowl, mix together all dressing ingredients.

Pour the dressing over the broccoli salad and mix together until the salad is evenly coated. Refrigerate for 20 to 30 minutes or until cool. Give the salad a quick stir and garnish with additional tarragon and parsley before serving.

Butternut Squash Stuffed with Apples and Cranberries

Butternut Squash Stuffed with Apples and Cranberries by Laura TheodoreRecipe excerpt from: Laura Theodore’s Vegan-Ease
by Laura Theodore
Jazzy Vegetarian

Makes 4 servings

In the northeast, late fall at the farm market brings many enticing kinds of squash. Butternut is one of my favorite varieties of winter squash to cook with because of its nutty sweetness. Stuffed with a savory and sweet blend of rice, spinach, apples, walnuts and cranberries, this cold weather seasonal dish makes a festive, nutritious and appealing entrée for any special meal.

  • 1 very large butternut squash, peeled
  • 2 cups cooked short-grain brown rice
  • 1½ cups lightly packed baby spinach
  • 1 medium apple, peeled, cored and diced
  • ¼ cup dried cranberries
  • ¼ cup finely chopped walnuts
  • 1 teaspoon all-purpose seasoning blend or Italian seasoning blend
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Line a large casserole dish with unbleached parchment paper.

Cut 2- to 3-inches off the top of the squash. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and then cut each piece in half lengthwise to make 4 sections of squash, equal in size. Scrape out the seeds from each section.

Put the rice, spinach, apple, cranberries, walnuts, all-purpose seasoning, sea salt and ground cinnamon in a medium-sized bowl and stir to combine. Divide the stuffing mixture evenly, mounding it into the hollowed center in each of the four squash pieces, mounding it as you go (see note).

Put the squash quarters, stuffing side up, in the prepared casserole dish. Tent with foil and bake for 1 to 11⁄2 hours, or until the squash is very soft. For a crisp topping, remove the foil for the last 10 minutes of baking. Let cool 10 to 15 minutes and serve.

Chef’s Note: If you end up with extra stuffing, put it in a small, covered casserole and bake alongside the squash like a holiday stuffing. Makes a great side dish.

Amount per serving, based on 4 servings:  332 Calories; 6g Fat; 1g Saturated fat; 9g Protein; 35mg Sodium; 70g Total Carbohydrate; 17g Sugars; 11g Fiber

Photo Credit: David Kaplan

Recipe from Laura Theodore’s Vegan-Ease: An Easy Guide to Enjoying a Plant-Based Diet
©Laura Theodore 2015, 2020. Reprinted by permission.

Show 97, November 15, 2014: Thanksgiving Cooking Tips with Chef Noah Blom

Marin Howarth and Executive Chef Noah BlomIn his formative years Chef Noah worked in some incredible restaurants including Restaurant Daniel in Manhattan. He also opened restaurants for Laurent Tourendel. In Orange County, before he started ARC, he was part of the culinary team at Mesa.

With the high pressure Thanksgiving Holiday ahead he has some great practical tips to make your Thanksgiving less stressful and more delicious. Chef Noah talks about selecting the bird and various proven cooking techniques. He also explains what a Heritage Turkey is. What should you do with the cranberries? Chef Noah has the answer there, too.

Chef Noah’s wife and partner, Marin Howarth, runs the front-of-the house at ARC.

Thanksgiving is one of only three days in the year ARC is closed. Chef Noah and Marin host a private Thanksgiving meal in the restaurant for their staff and extended ARC family.

Play