Chicken with Walnuts and Lemon, from the Dordogne

Chicken with Walnuts and Lemon, from the Dordogne

Recipe excerpt from:
Plat du Jour: French Dinners Made Easy
by Susan Herrmann Loomis

Serves 4 to 6
Equipment: large heavy skillet with a lid, tongs
Preparation Time: 10 minutes if the chicken is in pieces; 20 if not
Cooking Time: 40 minutes max
Difficulty Level: simple

This is a dish from a farm in the Dordogne, where the walnuts are sweet, fat, and buttery tasting, and they make a perfect complement to poultry. This is the kind of dish that you settle down to with comfort and anticipation, because it’s got all the right elements, from cloves of garlic bursting with their sweet flavor to the golden chicken and walnuts and the tang of lemon that lifts the dish out of the ordinary. Serve this with a lovely Chardonnay.

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • One 3½- to 4-pound (1.8 to 2 kg) chicken, cut into 8 pieces (2 breast pieces, 2 wings with portion of breast attached, 2 legs, 2 thighs), giblets reserved
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1½ to 2 cups (375 to 500 ml) white wine, such as a sauvignon blanc
  • 12 garlic cloves
  • 1¼ cups (140 g) walnut halves or large pieces
  • Fresh flat-leaf parsley sprigs for garnish
  1. Heat the oil in a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot but not smoking, brown the chicken pieces, seasoning them liberally with salt and pepper, until they are golden, about 5 minutes per side, using tongs to turn the chicken pieces.
  2. Add the lemon juice, ½ cup (125 ml) of the wine, and the garlic cloves to the skillet. Lower the heat to medium, cover, and cook until the chicken is nearly cooked through, about 15 minutes. Then stir the walnuts into the skillet, along with the giblets, cover, and continue to cook for about 8 minutes. Remove the cover from the skillet and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the pan juices have evaporated and the chicken, walnuts, and garlic are golden, 5 to 8 minutes. Be sure to watch the walnuts, for they tend to brown easily. If they are getting too brown at any point in the cooking, remove and return them to the pan just before serving.
  3. Transfer the chicken, garlic, and walnuts to a warmed serving platter and deglaze the skillet with the remaining wine, scraping the bottom to loosen any caramelized bits. Begin by adding the smaller amount of wine; if you need more, top it up with the remaining wine and cook until the sauce is reduced by half, about 4 minutes. Then pour the sauce over the chicken, garnish with the parsley sprigs, and serve immediately.

Recipe from Plat Du Jour – French Dinners Made Easy by Susan Herrmann Loomis.  Used with permission.

Moroccan Kebabs with Chermoula Sauce

Moroccan Kebabs with Chermoula Sauce by Tara Teaspoonby Tara Bench
Tara Teaspoon

This is your new party-table centerpiece. Colorful and tasty skewers arranged around a dipping sauce is easy to make happen and creates a stunning platter. And the chermoula sauce (pronounced like the singer “Cher” then “moola,” like money) is expressive and lemony. The sauce is based on a Moroccan and Tunisian relish with a strong herb and spice situation. I keep the skewers of meat and veggies small so they can be bite-sized for a gathering, but you can make them more robust if you’d like to serve this recipe as a meal.

Kebabs

  • 1⁄2 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1⁄4 cup warm water
  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • 5 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 3 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • 2 teaspoons smoked paprika
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 1⁄2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into strips that are
  • 2 inches long and 1⁄2 inch thick
  • 2 yellow or orange bell peppers, cut into 1-inch squares
  • 2 small zucchini, thinly sliced into strips with a vegetable peeler
  • 1 (14.4-ounce) bag frozen pearl onions, thawed
  • 1 pint grape or cherry tomatoes
  • 45 (6-inch) bamboo skewers, soaked in water 20 minutes
  • 1 recipe Chermoula Sauce (see below), prepared
  1. In a large bowl, whisk together turmeric and pepper with 1⁄4 cup warm water. Let sit 3 minutes. Whisk in 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, the lemon juice, tomato paste, garlic, 1 teaspoon salt, paprika, cumin, coriander, and cinnamon.
  2. Season chicken strips with 1 teaspoon salt and add to the marinade. Cover and refrigerate to marinate 30 minutes.
  3. In a large bowl, toss peppers, zucchini, onions, and tomatoes with remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and season with 1 teaspoon kosher salt. Thread chicken on half of the skewers and vegetables on the other half, adding several slices of zucchini to each skewer. Discard chicken marinade.
  4. Heat grill to medium-high. Grill skewers, turning occasionally, until chicken is cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes total. Remove the vegetables from the grill as soon as they are done; they will cook faster than the chicken.
  5. Serve on a platter with the chermoula sauce for drizzling and dipping.

Chermoula Sauce

this spiced herb sauce is used on fish, meat, chicken, and vegetables and has a heady and unique flavor.

  • 1⁄2 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1⁄4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 3⁄4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Pinch red pepper flakes
  • 1 cup packed cilantro
  • 1 cup packed flat-leaf parsley
  • 1⁄2 cup packed mint leaves
  1. In a small skillet over medium-high heat, toast coriander and cumin seeds until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat and crush in a mortar and pestle or with the bottom of a pan.
  2. In the bowl of a food processor, combine crushed seeds, garlic, olive oil, lemon zest, lemon juice, paprika, salt, and red pepper flakes. Pulse to finely chop garlic. Add cilantro, parsley, and mint and blend until herbs are well combined. Store sauce in refrigerator until ready to use, up to 3 days.

Mandarin and Prosciutto Crostini

Mandarin and Prosciutto Crostini by Tara Teaspoonby Tata Bench
Tara Teaspoon

This is my essential appetizer. Toasted Crostini topped with a little slice of salty Prosciutto and some tangy Mandarin and Shallot Chutney. I’ve been known to make a full meal of these little bites. Double the caramelized shallot and mandarin portion of this recipe and keep the extra in the fridge. It works beautifully on top of chicken or a roast ham sandwich—or even for your next batch of crostini bites.

Chutney

  • 2 cups sliced shallots, sliced root to tip
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1⁄2 cup white balsamic vinegar
  • 1⁄2 cup light brown sugar
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon crushed coriander seeds
  • 1 cup fresh mandarin or clementine segments, roughly chopped
  • 1 recipe Crostini (below), prepared
  • 14 slices prosciutto
  • Toasted hazelnuts, crushed Fresh thyme
  1. In a medium, nonstick skillet over medium-low heat, sauté the shallots and salt in olive oil, stirring often, until soft and translucent, 10 to 12 minutes. Add the vinegar, brown sugar, bay leaf, and coriander seeds and let simmer until vinegar is reduced and almost gone, 10 to 12 minutes more. Stir in the mandarin seg- ments. Remove from heat and let cool slightly.
  2. Top crostini with a half piece of prosciutto and a spoonful of the mandarin chutney. Sprinkle with hazelnuts and thyme leaves.

Crostini

  • 1 baguette, sliced 1⁄4-inch thick
  • 1⁄4 cup olive oil
  • Kosher salt
  1. Heat oven to 375oF. Brush slices of bread lightly with olive oil on both sides. Lay slices flat on rimmed baking sheets and sprinkle with some salt.
  2. Bake, rotating pans halfway through, until lightly golden and crisp, 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool.
  3. Store crostinis in a zip-top bag for up to 3 days.

Looks Delicious. Whenever I caramelize onions or shallots, I slice them from their root to the tip. Slicing them crosswise into rings or half-moons causes them to cook into long, stringy worms. The root-to-tip method allows the shallot or onion to hold its shape, looks better, and is easier to eat.

Show 287, August 25, 2018: Chef Andrew Gruel, Founder, Slapfish Restaurant Group

Andrew and William GruelChef Andrew Gruel, the founder of The Slapfish Restaurant Group, joins us with another installment of Ask the Chef.”

Consider the poor, misunderstood sardine. There is actually a lot more to it than what is packed in a flat tin with olive oil, tomato sauce or mustard.

Fresh sardines (when available) grilled, fried or broiled are a treat. The great aspect to note is that with sardines you don’t have to worry about the bones and the fish is both healthy to enjoy and sustainable. Sardines grow fast. When fresh are not available the packaged, flash frozen version work well, too.

When you’re buying the flat tins of sardines Chef Andrew prefers them packed in tomato sauce.

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Show 269, April 14, 2018: Chef Andrew Gruel’s “Ask the Chef”

Andrew and William GruelOur always informed Co-Host, Chef Andrew Gruel, is back in-studio and continues with his Ask the Chef series.

Today it’s Butter 411. These days butter is a bit of a maligned cooking fat. Olive oil seemingly reigns supreme. It really can be better with butter as Julia Child told us over the years. Butter adds taste and flavor to recipes and a modest amount can go a long way.

We’ll reflect on this as Chef Andrew puts the butter churn aside and has the flavorful specifics for us.

 

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Show 241, September 16, 2017: Catalina Offshore Products 40th Anniversary

Tommy GomesForty years ago, Catalina Offshore Products owner Dave Rudie spent most of his days diving for sea urchins and seaweed in the kelp beds of Catalina Island, selling his harvest right off his boat. Eventually he opened a small processing facility in San Diego, making local deliveries throughout the region and later exporting to Japan. Catalina Offshore Products has since grown steadily into one of the region’s premier seafood purveyors and one of the largest seafood buyers in San Diego.

Catalina’s Choice Solid Pack Tuna in Olive Oil (new product) features U.S. hook-and-line bigeye and yellowfin, both also referred to as “ahi”.

This premium, responsibly harvested tuna is wild caught in the Eastern Pacific by U.S. fishing vessels, landed in San Diego and processed and packed in the USA. Hand-cut and cooked once, it is all natural, with no additives or preservatives.

Though Catalina Offshore Products fresh, local, sustainably sourced tuna has always been a big seller, canning any unsold product enables them to ensure the precious resource is even more well-managed. Additionally, it celebrates San Diego’s beloved history. The city was once known as the “Tuna Capital of the World”!

Tirelessly passionate about seafood, Catalina Offshore Products resident fishmonger, Tommy Gomes, is our guest. Tommy also oversees COP’s busy Seafood Nutrition and Education Center, which includes the retail fish market!

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Show 227, June 10, 2017: Sciabica’s California Olive Oil, Modesto

Sciabica's California Olive OilSciabica’s California Olive Oil has been cold pressed in California since 1936. The olive oil is used in the kitchens at Pechanga and Sciabica’s, now in its 4th generation of Family ownership, is part of the Microbrew Festival.

“The Sciabica family’s long tradition of olive oil production began in Sicily, in the olive oil mills of Castelvetrano in the province of Trapani – a region famous for olives and olive oil. In 1887 Nicola (Nick) Sciabica was born in Marsala, Sicily and as a young man, he learned the ancient art of producing olive oil in Trapani.”

“In 1911 Nicola immigrated to the United States, settled and started a family in Waterbury Connecticut, but longed for the warm Mediterranean climate. After many years of searching, he eventually found Modesto, California. He fell in love with Modesto. Nicola said, “This is like home.” and in 1925, with his wife and their 3 sons, he purchased a small ranch in Modesto.”

“11 years later, in 1936, with the knowledge that Nicola brought from olive oil making in Sicily, the Sciabicas began cold-pressing Marsala® Brand Olive Oil (named after his birthplace). Marsala is now the undisputed oldest continuously produced California Olive Oil. Today, the Sciabicas still reside, farm and cold-press olive oil on the same property.”

“In the late 80’s the family pioneered “single varietal” olive oils, keeping individual olive types separate (just like wine). For over 30 years we have been offering our single varietal olive oils under the Sciabica’s® label, ranging from Buttery-Sweet to Peppery & Robust, depending on the olive varietal and season of pressing. In the 90’s the family again blazed a new path with ‘Fresh Flavored’ olive oil, uniquely made fresh in the press by sending fresh fruit, herbs or peppers (such as Lemons, Basil and Jalapeños) with the olives through the presses. 2 ingredients, no artificials or heat infusion, resulting in a remarkable fresh flavor and health experience.”

Jim Livesay is our guest representing Sciabica’s California Olive Oil.

 

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Sustenance Stew

Sustenance Stewby Tess Masters
The Blender Girl

I’m a sucker for stew, and this one is seriously delicious and so quick and easy. The combination of rich, creamy almond butter, sautéed sweet potatoes, and spices will make you mmmm your delight at every bite. This hearty dish, loaded with protein (the optional greens and seeds add even more), is an alkalizing, immune-boosting, chlorophyll-rich crusader.

Serves 5 to 6

Cauliflower Eice

2 medium heads cauliflower, cut into florets
¼ cup (60ml) extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon natural salt, plus more to taste

Stew

1 tablespoon grapeseed oil or extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, roughly chopped
2 teaspoons minced garlic (about 2 cloves)
Natural salt
3 cups (720ml) vegetable broth
2 (14.5-ounce/411g) cans whole tomatoes with their juice
1½ tablespoons minced fresh ginger
¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
4 cups (570g) peeled and roughly diced orange-flesh sweet potatoes
3 cups (210g) chopped broccoli florets
4 cups (120g) Swiss chard, stalks removed, leaves cut into ribbons (about 1 large bunch)
1/3 cup (43g) roasted almond butter
½ cup (14g) loosely packed finely chopped cilantro
1 medium avocado, pitted, peeled, and sliced
½ cup (80g) sliced raw almonds

optional boosters

¼ cup (35g) shelled hemp seeds
1 tablespoon chia seeds (black or white)
¼ cup (10g) pea greens

To make the cauliflower rice, preheat the oven to 375°F (180°C). Line a large baking sheet with a silicone liner or parchment paper.

Put the cauliflower florets in a food processor and pulse about 5 times, until the cauliflower has the texture of couscous. You may have to process in two batches. Transfer the cauliflower to a large bowl and stir in the oil and 1 teaspoon of salt until well combined.

Transfer the “rice” to the prepared baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes. Stir with a spatula or wooden spoon and continue to roast for another 15 minutes, until the “rice” begins to brown. Set aside until ready to serve.

To make the stew, in a large pot over medium heat, warm the oil and sauté the onion and garlic with a pinch of salt for about 5 minutes, until the onion is soft and translucent.

Meanwhile, add the broth, tomatoes, ginger, and red pepper flakes to your blender and pulse a few times on low until rustically chopped and combined but not blended. Stir the sweet potatoes and broth mixture into the sautéed onion. Increase the heat to high and bring the mixture to a boil. Lower the heat to medium, add 1/2 teaspoon of salt, and simmer, uncovered and stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes, until the sweet potato is just tender. Add the broccoli and simmer for another 5 minutes. Stir in the chard and almond butter and simmer for another 5 minutes, until the chard is just wilted. The broth should be absorbed and you should have a creamy vegetable dish. Stir in the cilantro and tweak the salt to taste.

To serve, spoon equal amounts of the cauliflower rice into bowls and spoon the stew next to or over the “rice.” Top with the avocado and sliced almonds and sprinkle with the hemp seed and chia seed boosters. Finish by topping with the pea greens booster.

Nutritional Facts (per serving, based on 6 servings)

calories 126 kcal | fat 9.6 g | saturated fat 1.4 g | sodium 324.8 mg | carbs 8.8 g | fiber 2.8 g | sugars 4 g | protein 3.6 g | calcium 68.6 mg | iron 1.8 mg

CREDIT: Reprinted with permission from The Perfect Blend, copyright 2016 Tess Masters. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC.
Photography Copyright 2016 by Anson Smart

Show 190, September 24, 2016: Show Preview with Executive Producer & Co-Host Andy Harris and Chef Andrew Gruel of Slapfish Restaurant Group

Please note… Next Saturday, October 1st we’re preempted in our usual morning slot for Fighting Irish Football. No worries as we’ll still have a live show for you at the special afternoon time of 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on October 1st only. Thanks & please help spread the word…

Andrew Gruel and his son WilliamExecutive Chef Andrew Gruel of the rapidly growing Slapfish empire with restaurants in Huntington Beach, Brea, Laguna Beach, Newport Beach, LAX, Irvine at UCI and, most recently, The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum for Rams and USC Football, is back as today’s Guest Host. San Clemente is launching next. In May in Chicago during the National Restaurant Association’s annual conclave he received Nation’s Restaurant News’ Trendsetter MenuMaster Award for Slapfish.

Our food-loving colleagues in Richmond, British Columbia are at it again. Richmond is known for having some of the best and most authentic regional Chinese food outside of China. For all of us in SoCal it’s a whole lot closer. Just launched is “Travel the Dumpling Trail.” Colin Wong, Director of Communications for Tourism Richmond, joins us with all the crave-worthy details.

Noted gourmand Darrell Corti of Corti Brothers gourmet grocery and spirit purveyors in Sacramento is the Chairman of the globally respected L.A. International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition. We’ll chat about the Southern Hemisphere tasting and lots more, and how the public can sample some of the winning oils during the closing Weekend of the L.A. County Fair. TheDailyMeal.com has dubbed him one of the coolest people in food and drink in America.

L.A. Kitchen is a high-profile, local non-profit whose thoughtful mission is that food and people should never go to waste. On Saturday evening, October 22nd they are launching their first ever fundraiser: Shared Plates. It’s “a night of 100 dinner parties” across Los Angeles. Robert Egger, Founder & CEO of L.A. Kitchen is our guest with a preview.

At 25, Chef Marcel Vigneron competed on the memorable Season 2 of Bravo’s “Top Chef” and, impressively, was the Runner-Up. He now has two side-by-side restaurants on Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles, Wolf (Seasonal LA Cuisine) and the plant-based, Beefsteak. We’ll meet him.

Austin-born burger joint Hopdoddy Burger Bar, known for its thoughtfully crafted selection of high quality burgers, craft beer and handspun shakes, has recently opened their second Orange County location at The Market Place in Tustin. Hopdoddy’s Brand Manager, Erin Fohn>, joins us with all the hot & juicy specifics.

Foodbeast presents the 2nd Annual OozeFest in Downtown Santa Ana on the Weekend of October 15th and 16th. It’s the very cheesiest of course, with awesome cheese creations and premium beer! There is a VIP all-you-can-eat option this year. Producer Bobby Navarro of 100eats.com has the gooey details for us.

Co-host Chef Andrew Gruel> of Slapfish Restaurant Group has two young children and also enjoys dining out at all levels of establishments. What to do? Chef Andrew shares his top picks for chef-driven restaurants that are also kid-friendly. Mangia…

All of this and lots more absolutely incredible deliciousness on Saturday’s show!

Show 190, September 24, 2016: Darrell Corti, Chair, L.A. International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition

Darrell CortiNoted gourmand Darrell Corti of Corti Brothers gourmet grocery and spirit purveyors in Sacramento is the Chairman of the globally respected L.A. International Extra Virgin Olive Oil Competition. We’ll chat about the Southern Hemisphere tasting and lots more and how the public can sample some of the winning oils during the final Weekend of the L.A. County Fair. TheDailyMeal.com has dubbed him one of the coolest people in food and drink in America.

For the Southern Hemisphere competition 101 oils were evaluated from 45 producers in Australia, New Zealand and South America. The judging yielded 82 awards.

Now in its 17th year, the Los Angeles International Olive Oil Competition is the top ranking EVOO competition in the United States and fifth worldwide. The goal is to bring together the highest standards of integrity and professionalism in awarding medals to the best oils from around the globe.

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