Show 449, October 30, 2021: Clean Eating Kitchen’s Michelle Dudash, Registered Dietarian Nutritionist – The Low-Carb Mediterranean Cookbook Part Two

Michelle Dudash RDN

“From the creator of Clean Eating Kitchen, Registered Dietarian Nutritionist Michelle Dudash presents The Low-Carb Mediterranean Cookbook with simple, plant-focused recipes for lifelong health.”

“The Mediterranean diet holds the top rank for being easy to follow and delivering proven results for improved heart health and blood sugar management, decreased risk of cancer, and increased longevity. This cookbook combines the best aspects of the Mediterranean diet with more than 100 nutritious recipes that help the whole family eat clean including 60 meals that can be prepared in 30-minutes or less.”

“Clean Eating Kitchen: The Low-Carb Mediterranean Cookbook delivers the benefits of the Mediterranean diet with fewer carbs, satisfying a mostly plant- and seafood-based regimen that is higher in protein and good fats. This book includes the healthiest, most crave-worthy ingredients and flavors of the Mediterranean diet that are sure to induce wanderlust. Included are satisfying dishes ranging from Creamy Spinach Pie with Almond Flour Crust to Sheet Pan Chickpea and Broccoli Dinner.”

“With low-carb and low-sugar recipes packed with protein, you and your family can stay healthy by following one of the best eating lifestyles in the world. Enjoy simple, wholesome meals that leave everyone around the table happy and satisfied with the Clean Eating Kitchen: The Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet Cookbook.”

The last Chapter in the cookbook is “La Dolce Vita: Sweets and Fruit Dishes.” Chef Michelle highlights one of her favorite desserts – Vegan Chocolate Mousse with Aquafaba.

Michelle gracious shares with us her recipes for Mini Bell Peppers Stuffed with Turkey and Pistachios, and Sheet Pan Chickpea and Broccoli Dinner from The Low-Carb Mediterranean Cookbook.

Michelle Dudash continues with us with tongs at the ready.

Play

Mini Bell Peppers stuffed with Turkey and Pistachios

Mini Bell Peppers stuffed with Turkey and Pistachios by Michelle Dudash

Recipe excerpt from:
Clean Eating Kitchen: The Low-Carb Mediterranean Cookbook
by Michelle Dudash

I love those raw sweet mini bell peppers for snacking. Just wash and eat! They also look adorable stuffed with ground turkey and roasted as little appetizers. You can prep these a day in advance and pop them into the oven right before party time.

  • 1 (1-pound) bag mini bell peppers (about 16)
  • 3/4 pound ground turkey (93% lean)
  • 1⁄3 cup shelled pistachios, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, divided
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground coriander (see Recipe Note)
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

Preheat the oven to 400º F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Cut off the tops of the peppers right between the straight sides and the rounded shoulders. Pull out the seeds and membranes using your fingers or dislodge with a paring knife. Poke a hole into the pointy tips of the peppers, making an air gap to allow for easier stuffing.

In a medium bowl, combine the turkey, pistachios (reserving 2 tablespoons for later), vinegar, cumin, 1/4 teaspoon salt, coriander, cinnamon, and pepper. Using a small spoon or butter knife, stuff the peppers with the turkey, leaving a nice rounded top protruding out a bit at the top of the peppers. Gently roll the meat ends of the peppers into the reserved pistachios. Place the peppers on the prepared baking sheet. Drizzle with the oil and sprinkle with the remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt.

Bake until the largest peppers are blistered and tender, 15 to 20 minutes.

Suggestions and Variations
For a pepper-free version, you can shape the turkey into small patties and sauté in a bit of olive oil over medium heat.

Recipe Note
My preferred way to buy coriander is as whole seeds and then grinding only the amount I need in a mortar and pestle. It adds texture to the dish, where a fine powder can’t. And the aroma is dreamy. It’s one of my favorite spices, and I use it in Asian-style stir-fries, chili, and meat rubs.

Total prep and cook time: 30 minutes • Yield: 16 Servings, 1 Pepper Each

Per Serving: 57 Calories, 2 G Carbohydrate (1 G Fiber, 0 G Added Sugars, 1 G Net Carbs), 5 G Protein, 4 G Fat, 85 MG Sodium.

Show 400, November 21, 2020: Chef & Proprietress Geeta Bansal, Clay Oven, Irvine

Geeta Bansal of Clay Oven in Irvine“For over 36 years Clay Oven’s cuisine directed by Executive Chef & Proprietress Geeta Bansal has been about transforming tradition and old techniques of Indian cuisine while retaining the flavor profile to make them relevant to the present times and lifestyle. Food progresses and changes, and Clay Oven consistently strives to move Indian cuisine forward into the present and attempts to modernize their dishes while keeping the Ayurvedic principles intact. The menus are tied to the seasons and what is growing locally.”

“Clay Oven serves a large selection of game including venison, wild boar, rabbit, duck, antelope, quail, and elk. Fruits and vegetables in season appear alongside organic herbs grown in their own garden. There is no fusion of cuisines, just a fun and creative Indian experience created for their guests.”

Clay Oven is currently operating for takeout, curbside, and delivery only. A yearly (limited-time) special Thanksgiving tradition at Clay Oven, Tandoori Turkey, is still available to order.

Clay Oven is on the move…As of December 1st Clay Oven is relocating to Costa Mesa on a temporary basis and will continue to serve guests via takeout, curbside and delivery exclusively. A new dine-in location is planned for the future as allowable.

Chef Geeta Bansal is our guest.

Play

Show 399, November 14, 2020: Co-Host Chef Andrew Gruel of the Slapfish Restaurant Group with “Ask the Chef”

Chef Andrew Gruel of the Slapfish Restaurant GroupOur own Chef Andrew Gruel of the Slapfish Restaurant Group provides another timely and informative “Ask the Chef” segment where Chef Andrew responds to listeners thoughtful inquiries. Chef Andrew is regularly updating us on the impact of the Covid-19 crisis in the hospitality field and what we, as diners, can do to support the very survival of restaurants.

Thanksgiving is fast approaching on November 26th. In the spirit of the Holidays it’s appropriate for Chef Andrew to now share his best Thanksgiving cooking tips. This week we’re talking about cooking the seasoned bird. Chef Andrew suggests this might be the year to spatchcock the turkey. It seems more people will be doing Family Thanksgiving at home this year and probably with smaller groups. We’ll “Ask the Chef.”

Play

Show 398, November 7, 2020: Co-Host Chef Andrew Gruel of the Slapfish Restaurant Group with “Ask the Chef”

Chef Andrew Gruel of the Slapfish Restaurant GroupOur own Chef Andrew Gruel of the Slapfish Restaurant Group provides another timely and informative “Ask the Chef” segment where Chef Andrew responds to listeners thoughtful inquiries. Chef Andrew is regularly updating us on the impact of the Covid-19 crisis in the hospitality field and what we, as diners, can do to support the very survival of restaurants. Dine-in is slowly, with multiple hiccups, starting to come back but with a lot of new rules that restrict guest counts. Alternately Take-Out / Delivery when you can surely helps…

Thanksgiving is fast approaching on November 26th. In the spirit of the Holidays it’s appropriate for Chef Andrew to now share his best Thanksgiving cooking tips. It seems more people will be doing Family Thanksgiving at home this year and probably with smaller groups. We’ll “Ask the Chef.” To brine or not brine is probably the first turkey preparation dilemma.

Play

Show 296, November 3, 2018: Chef Andrew Gruel, Chef’s Tips for Stress-Free Holiday Entertaining, Part 1

Andy Harris and Andrew Gruel at Cabana 14 at the Cove at Pechanga Resort and CasinoThe Holidays are fast approaching and it’s time for the return of our Ask the Chef” segment with our own resident cooking authority, Chef Andrew Gruel. Chef Andrew provides a bevy of his always reliable best tips for stress-free Holiday entertaining. There is much more than turkey on the Holiday table…

To brine or not to brine that is perhaps the Thanksgiving question? How do you get all the parts of the turkey to cook evenly?

Play

Show 285, August 11, 2018: Owner / Chefs Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis, Bavel, DTLA’s Arts District

Executive Chef Ori Menashe and Pastry Chef Genevieve Gergis of BestiaWhen we last spoke with Owner/Chefs Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis they had recently opened Bestia (2012) in DTLA’s emerging Arts District. Flash forward to the recent opening of their long-in-the-works Bavel (buh-vel), also in the Arts District. It’s Middle Eastern flavors with influences from Israel, Morocco, Turkey and Egypt.

“Bavel, in Downtown Los Angeles’ Arts District, is a Middle Eastern restaurant from Chefs Ori Menashe and Genevieve Gergis. With family roots in Israel, Morocco, Turkey, and Egypt, Ori and Genevieve have always wanted to open a restaurant that showcases the cuisines of their family lineages, bringing together the flavors and dishes they grew up with.”

With a background in the field of interior design, Genevieve played a key role in the design of both Bestia and Bavel.

“Bavel – Stems from the story of Babel, from the original Old Testament. The Hebrew letters ‘b’ – bet, and ‘v’ – vet, both look the same, except that bet has a dot in the center of it. It is theorized that when the Old Testament was translated, it was not transcribed properly and Bavel turned into Babel.”

“The name is pronounced how it was originally written – Bavel (buh-vel). The story of Bavel is from a time when the Middle East was one. The people of Babylon came together to build a tower to heaven but God did not want them to succeed. In turn, he gave the people different languages so they could no longer communicate and work together.”

“When we read this story, we liked the word Bavel, because it was written during a time when everything was one – Bavel is not specific to any one region.”

We pull them both from the bustling Bavel kitchen (incredible bread is baking) for a chat.

 

Play

Show 247, November 11, 2017: Travel Journalist Robyn Eckhardt, Istanbul and Beyond: Exploring Turkey’s Diverse Cuisines Part One

Robyn EckhardtFood and travel journalist Robyn Eckhardt brings dishes from Istanbul and eastern Turkey to the home cook in ISTANBUL AND BEYOND: EXPLORING TURKEY’S DIVERSE CUISINES. With over 125 recipes, stories about places, people and ingredients, and lush on-location photography, ISTANBUL AND BEYOND takes readers on an unforgettable culinary journey from Turkey’s cosmopolitan cultural capital to its lesser known eastern regions.

The culmination of Eckhardt and photographer David Hagerman‘s (Robyn’s husband) two-decade-long passion for Turkey, its people and its food, and the result of over sixteen months of research in Istanbul and eastern Turkey, ISTANBUL AND BEYOND takes readers beyond kebab, doner, and baklava to introduce the dishes of Turkey’s distinct regional cuisines. From the Mediterranean province of Hatay to the Black Sea, and from north-central Anatolia to provinces bordering Georgia, Armenia, Iran and Iraq, Eckhardt has assembled a broad collection of dishes – many of which will be new even to those familiar with Turkish food – that are sure to entice readers into the kitchen.

Robyn Eckhardt is an American food and travel journalist specializing in Asia, Turkey and Europe. Her words and recipes have appeared in the New York Times, Saveur, Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Food & Wine, Travel+Leisure and other publications. She is co-publisher, with photographer David Hagerman, of the award-winning food blog EatingAsia. After 20 years in Asia she recently moved to Piemonte, Italy, where she lives with her husband, photographer David Hagerman, and a small menagerie of cats and dogs.

Food and travel journalist Robyn Eckhardt is our guest.

Play

Show 247, November 11, 2017: Travel Journalist Robyn Eckhardt, Istanbul and Beyond: Exploring Turkey’s Diverse Cuisines Part Two

Robyn Eckhardt“Turkey touches four bodies of water and shares borders with Bulgaria, Greece, Syria, Iraq, Iran, Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Georgia…This results in not a nation united by one cuisine, but an array of culinary regions that make it one of the most gastronomically complex countries anywhere.” – Robyn Eckhardt

There is so much more to Turkish food than kebabs and baklava. Dishes like Green Olive Salad with Pomegranate Molasses, Kurdish-style Pot-Roasted Chicken & Onions, and Fava & Bulgar Stuffed Grape Leaves in Tomato Sauce prove just that. In Instanbul & Beyond – Exploring the Diverse Cuisines of Turkey, Robyn Eckhardt brings you the most extensive Turkish cookbook to date with a broad collection of 150 easy-to-follow recipes taken from the home cooks, farmers, fishermen, and bakers native to Turkey, all tested for the American home kitchen. Most of these recipes have never been published before in English.

Eckhardt and travel photographer husband, David Hagerman, have been collecting these recipes over the past twenty years and have traveled over 21,000 kilometers along the backroads of Turkey, documenting regional cuisines and life in the villages and cities, farms, and high pastures of the lesser-known provinces.

 

Play

Show 198, November 19, 2016: Chef Andrew Gruel, Slapfish Restaurant Group

Andrew Gruel at the AM830 KLAA StudiosThanksgiving dinner is upon us. If you’re cooking the Thanksgiving feast at home it can be a stressful time. To the rescue comes our own Chef Andrew Gruel, a real working chef. Time to enjoy being with Family.

He has some useful tips for preparing the Thanksgiving meal with a minimum of aggravation.

Chef Andrew offers some useful hints for improving on the preparation of the mashed potatoes and preserving valuable kitchen space in the process. Also, a chef’s secret for peeling the potatoes with ease.

How about adding some excitement to the same familiar side dishes? Chef Andrew suggests grilling corn on the cob instead of creamed corn.

Also he has inspiration for improving on the stuffing. Use your favorite stale bread, season well and use flavorful cooking liquid. Adding an egg really improves the texture. Also bake outside of the turkey.

Consider adding a dish out of the norm. I’m hearing turkey tamales calling…

Bring on the properly seasoned stuffing…

 

Play