Spa Citrus and Burrata Salad “Italiano”

Citrus Burrata Salad by Maria Provenzano

Recipe excerpt from:
Everyday Celebrations from Scratch
by Maria Provenzano

Serves 4

  • 2 grapefruit
  • 2 oranges
  • 2 (8 ounce) balls of burrata
  • 1/3 cup chopped mint
  • 1/3 cup chopped or torn basil
  • Edible flowers, optional
  • Olive Oil to taste
  • Honey to taste
  • Sea Salt to taste
  • Pepper to taste, optional

Cut the grapefruit and oranges by cutting off the outer peel and the pith. Cut the fruit into about 1/4 to 1/2-inch pieces, or segment the grapefruit and the oranges by using a knife to cut off the peel, then use a small sharp knife to cut between each segment to remove the pieces of the fruit. Whichever way you prefer. Place the burrata onto a platter and use your hands to break it up into smaller pieces around the platter. Place the cut grapefruit and oranges around the burrata.  Sprinkle the mint and basil over citrus and burrata. Place the edible flowers around the platter.  Lightly drizzle olive oil and honey over the top and then sprinkle with sea salt and pepper to taste.  Adjust the flavors and add more of anything you like.

Show 80, July 19, 2014: Chef Shachi Mehra, ADYA – Fresh Indian Flavors, Anaheim

Shachi MehraChef Shachi Mehra is well-known to Orange County diners as the opening chef for the fine-dining Tamarind of London in Newport Coast. Now Chef Shachi has branched out on her own and launched the more accessible ADYA in the Anaheim Packing House. It’s a reflection of modern India cuisine revolving around fresh, sustainable ingredients, simply prepared, in a casual setting.

Earlier in her career Chef Shachi was mentored by pioneering Indian Chef Floyd Cardoz in Manhattan. She worked at both Tabla and Bread Bar eventually rising to the position of Head Cook at Bread Bar.

“With ADYA, I present an Indian experience that will allow those who are both familiar and less experienced with Indian cuisine to embark on a delicious, unique culinary journey that emphasizes fresh ingredients and pronounced flavors,” commented Chef Shachi, who blends Western and Indian cultures to create artful dishes that successfully marry tradition with modernity. “The casual setting of ADYA makes it inviting and accommodating to a wide range of guests who seek out the rich experiences that Indian cuisine has to offer.”

Indian kebabs differ from Middle Eastern ones. They are cooked in the tandoor and also have different spicing.

ADYA has two tandoor ovens. One is for the breads (lower temperature) and the other is for the meats.

Chef Shachi is delighted that her Pani Puri with spicy tamarind water, potatoes, and mint has proven so popular. That’s the real article when you are talking about authentic Indian Street Food.